Reduced Sugar Apple Butter

  

Quantity: 4 to 5 half-pints

Jar size: Half-pints or pints

Ingredients:

4 pounds apples*
1 cup apple cider
½ cup granulated sucralose*
1 Tablespoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon ground allspice

Instructions:

  1. Wash and rinse half-pint or pint canning jars; keep hot until ready to fill. Prepare lids and screw bands according to manufacturer’s directions.
  2. Wash apples well and remove stems. Cut apples into quarters or eighths and remove cores.
  3. Combine unpeeled apples and cider in 8-quart saucepan. Cook slowly and stir occasionally to prevent sticking. Cook until apples are very soft (falling apart).
  4. Position a food mill or strainer securely over a large bowl. Press cooked apples with cider through the food mill or strainer to make a pulp. Be sure to collect all the pulp that comes through the food mill or strainer; for example, scrape any pulp clinging under the food mill into the bowl.
  5. Combine pulp with sucralose and spices in an 8-quart saucepan. Simmer over low heat, stirring frequently.
  6. To test for doneness, spoon a small quantity onto a clean plate; when the butter mounds on the plate without liquid separating around the edge of the butter, it is ready for processing. Another way to test for doneness is to remove a spoonful of the cooked butter on a spoon and hold it away from steam for 2 minutes. It is done if the butter remains mounded on the spoon.
  7. Fill hot apple butter into clean hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace.
  8. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids.
  9. Process in a boiling water or pressure canner according to the recommendations. Let cool, undisturbed, 12-24 hours and check for seals.

Processing time:

Processing Times for Boiling Water Canner

 

Process Time at Altitudes of

Style of Pack

Jar Size

0 – 1,000 ft

 

1,001 – 6,000 ft

Above 6,000 ft

 

Hot

Half-pints or Pints

15 minutes

20 minutes

25 minutes

Source: National Center for Home Food Preservation




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