Canned Soup

  

Jar size: Pints or Quarts

Ingredients:

Vegetable, dried bean or pea, meat, poultry, or seafood soups can be canned. These directions are intended for use with ingredients that already have separate canning recommendations for those foods.

Caution: Do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated first.

Instructions:

1. Select, wash, and prepare vegetables, meat and seafoods as described for the specific foods.

2. Wash and rinse canning jars; keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s directions.

3. Cover meat with water and cook until tender. Cool meat and remove bones.

4. Cook vegetables.

5. For each cup of dried beans or peas, add 3 cups of water, boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour, and heat to boil; drain.

6. Combine solid ingredients with meat broth, tomatoes, or water to cover. Boil 5 minutes. Caution: Do not thicken. Salt to taste, if desired.

7. Fill jars halfway with solid mixture. Add remaining liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.

8. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids.

9. process in a pressure canner according to the recommendations. Let cool, undisturbed, 12-24 hours and check for seals.

 

Processing time:

Processing Times for Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner

 

 

 

Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of:

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0-2000 ft

2001-4000 ft

4001-6000 ft

6001-8000 ft

Hot

Pints

60 min*

11 lb

12 lb

13 lb

14 lb

Quarts

75 min*

11 lb

12 lb

13 lb

14 lb

*Caution: Process 100 minutes if soup contains seafood.

 

Processing Times for Weighted-Gauge Pressure Canner

 

 

 

Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0-1000 ft

Above 1000 ft

Hot

Pints

60 min*

10 lb

15 lb

Quarts

75 min*

10 lb

15 lb

*Caution: Process 100 minutes if soup contains seafood.

Source:

National Center for Home Food Preservation




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