Tomato Sauce

  

Quantity: For thin sauce - An average of 35 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 21 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 53 pounds and yields -0 to 12 quarts of sauce--an average of 5 pounds per quart. For thick sauce-An average of 46 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 28 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 53 pounds and yields 7 to 9 quarts of sauce-an average of 6½ pounds per quart.

Jar size: Pints or Quarts

Instructions:

1. Wash and rinse canning jars; keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s directions.

2. Wash tomatoes, remove stems, and trim off bruised or discolored portions.

3. To prevent juice from separating, quickly cut about 1 pound of fruit into quarters and put directly into saucepan. Heat immediately to boiling while crushing. Continue to slowly add and crush freshly cut tomato quarters to the boiling mixture. Make sure the mixture boils constantly and vigorously while you add the remaining tomatoes. Simmer 5 minutes after you add all pieces.

OR

If you are not concerned about juice separation, simply slice or quarter tomatoes into a large saucepan. Crush, heat, and simmer for 5 minutes before juicing.

4. Press both types of heated juice through a sieve or food mill to remove skins and seeds.

5. Simmer in large-diameter saucepan until sauce reaches desired consistency Boil until volume is reduced by about one-third for thin sauce, or by one-half for thick sauce.

6. Add bottled lemon juice or citric acid to jars:

  • To ensure safe acidity in whole, crushed, or juiced tomatoes, add two tablespoons of bottled lemon juice or 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid per quart of tomatoes.
  • For pints, use one tablespoon bottled lemon juice or 1/4 teaspoon citric acid. Acid can be added directly to the jars before filling with product.
  • Add sugar to offset acid taste, if desired.
  • Four tablespoons of a 5 percent acidity vinegar per quart may be used instead of lemon juice or citric acid. However, vinegar may cause undesirable flavor changes.

7. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jars, if desired.

8. Fill jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace.

9. Wipe rims with clean damp cloth, adjust lids and process in either a boiling water canner or pressure canner according to the recommendations.

10. Let cool, undisturbed, 12-24 hours and check for seals.

Processing time:

Process Times for Boiling Water Canner

 

 

Process Times at Altitudes of:

Style of Pack

Jar Size

0-1000 ft

1001-3000 ft

3001-6000 ft

Above 6000 ft

Hot

Pints

35 min

40 min

45 min

50 min

Quarts

40 min

45 min

50 min

55 min

 

Processing Times for Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner

 

 

 

Canner Gauge Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of:

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0-2000 ft

2001-4000 ft

4001-6000 ft

6001-8000 ft

Hot

Pints or Quarts

20 min

6 lb

7 lb

8 lb

9 lb

Pints or Quarts

15 min

11 lb

12 lb

13 lb

14 lb

 

Process Times for Weighted-Gauge Pressure Canner

 

 

 

Canner Gauge Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0-1000 ft

Above 1000 ft

Hot

Pints or Quarts

20 min

5 lb

10 lb

Pints or Quarts

15 min

10 lb

15 lb

Pints or Quarts

10 min

15 lb

Not Recommended

 

Source:

National Center for Home Food Preservation




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