About Seasonal and simple

Seasonal and Simple is a guide to help you find, select, store, prepare and preserve fruits and vegetables. The recipes use simple preparations and seasonings, so you can taste the goodness of a fruit or vegetable at the peak of its flavor. The great variety of colors, flavors and textures of fruits and vegetables makes eating them a sensual pleasure.

Serving suggestions and recipes for fresh produce can be both a starting point and an inspiration for your seasonal eating. When you find a recipe that uses a preparation method that fits with your cooking experience or equipment - like roasting or grilling - you can try the method with other vegetables. Likewise, if you enjoy a seasoning - like basil or garlic - on one vegetable, then try the seasoning on other vegetables. You can hear Chef Brook Harlan talk about substituting vegetables in recipes and watch his demonstration of four recipes found in the guide online at extension.missouri.edu/healthylife.

Nutrients and associated health benefits are listed with each fruit or vegetable. The colors of fruits and vegetables are indicators of phytochemicals - the substances plants produce like lycopene, luetin and quercetin. The message from research is simple - eating a variety of colors of fruits and vegetables is an easy way to enjoy all the goodness of the wide array of nutrients found in different fruits and vegetables.

You can continue to enjoy the fruits and vegetables grown during the spring, summer and fall, when you preserve them at the peak of their flavor and freshness. Following the tested recipes and procedures provided here ensures that the harvest is canned, frozen or dried safely. Most Extension centers also provide information that will help you learn the best way to can, freeze or dry food. To find your local Extension Centers go to your state's Extension website: Iowa State University Extension University of Missouri Extension Nebraska Extension.

Choose fruits and vegetables in season and you get all the benefits - food that tastes good, is good for you and is reasonably priced. Whether you get your fruits and vegetables at your farmer's market, a roadside farm stand, through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), or from your own garden or local grocery store, enjoy the goodness of fruits and vegetables. Eat a variety every day.

This app was expanded in 2016 to include produce seasonality and Farmer's Market listings for Nebraska and Iowa.

This app was updated in 2015 to include food preservation recipes and information. The developers would like to acknowledge the use of material and videos from the National Center for Home Food Preservation and the University of Georgia, with special thanks to Elizabeth Andress, Ph.D., Professor and Extension Food Safety Specialist at the University of Georgia who directs the National Center.

This updated application was developed by the following faculty and staff at University of Missouri Extension:

Mary Wissmann, MS, RD, LD
Nutrition & Health Education Specialist

Linda S. Rellergert, MS
Nutrition & Health Education Specialist

Janet M. Hackert, MS
Nutrition & Health Education Specialist

James Meng
Programmer Analyst, Extension Technology and Computer Services

The original application was created by the following students, faculty, and staff at the University of Missouri

Human Environmental Sciences Extension


Jo Britt-Rankin
Associate Dean and Associate Professor
Human Environmental Sciences Extension
and State Specialist

Cindy Deblauw
Extension Associate
Human Environmental Sciences Extension

Computer Science/Information Technology


Bret Pudenz
Student
BS Computer Science

Matthew Jones
Student
BS Computer Science

Jazmine Tezak
Student
BS Computer Science

Dale Musser
Director
Information Technology Program
Associate Teaching Professor
Computer Science

Journalism


Corey Motley
Student
Journalism

Brittany Ness
Student
Journalism

Mike McKean
Director
Futures Lab
Reynolds Journalism Institute

Keith Politte
Manager
Technology Testing Center

Funding for this project was provided by the University of Missouri Extension, Nebraska Extension and Iowa State University Extension.





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